Diabetes Health Tips

Great Advice For Anyone Diagnosed With Diabetes

 

 

Learning to cope with diabetes can be a trial at the start. This article explores ideas on learning to live with diabetes. At first, a diagnosis of diabetes can come as a shock, yet learning tricks and tips to keep you healthy is important. There is no need to fall into a great depression with the diagnosis of diabetes, yet you do need to keep your health in check.

Make sure to take your diabetes medications exactly as directed. You are NOT a doctor, nor is anyone else giving you advice other than your physician. They tell you how often to take your prescriptions and how much you should take at a time because they know, so follow their directions.

Even if you are not feeling any symptoms, it is important that you check your blood sugar levels every few hours. People think that because they feel fine, their sugar levels are stabilized and this is not always true. It is the silent symptoms that could land you in the hospital.

To avoid developing more serious health problems because of your diabetes, be sure to take any prescribed medication as directed. Keeping track of medication can be a challenge, but it’s vital to maintaining your health. If your medications have troublesome side effects, see your doctor immediately, and don’t discontinue the medication without their okay.

Conditions like Gastroparesis can cause your stomach to empty itself of food more slowly than normal after you have eaten a meal. For diabetics, this can translate to unpredictable drops and spikes in blood glucose levels, which can then affect the way that you feel throughout the day. Consider speaking with your doctor about whether you should take your insulin later or sooner than the standard 45 minutes before a meal.

You should watch what you are eating if you have diabetes. Foods change blood sugar levels differently in different people, so it’s up to you to keep track of how foods affect you. Adapt your insulin injections to what you eat. If you are proactive with your meals, you will be able to appropriately manage your blood glucose levels.

There really is not a diabetic diet. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you get 50 percent of your calories from carbohydrates, 30 percent from fats, and 20 percent from proteins. Proteins work to stabilize blood sugars and to help you feel satisfied. Proteins also help your body to rebuild and provide nutrients your body needs not found in carbs and fats.

Take fast-acting insulin no longer than 15 minutes before you eat a meal, unless directed otherwise by a doctor. Taking this type of insulin can keep your blood sugar under control, that’s why doctors prescribe it. However, your doctor needs to monitor your dosage and explain how long you should wait to eat after taking insulin. This is to ensure you don’t have a blood sugar drop after taking it.

Following the above advice can really help you on the long road that faces you with a diagnosis of diabetes. After the initial shock, you should be well informed about the trials and tribulations that face you. Being able to face these roadblocks head-on and with confidence is something you need to learn right away.