Diabetes Matters

All about diabetes matters and health tips

Struggling With Diabetes? Try These Helpful Tips

Whether you have Type 1, Type 2 or Gestational Diabetes, make sure you’re doing whatever you can to treat the disease. Letting it spiral out of control can lead to a list of complications! Take a few minutes to read this article. See the tips below to help you manage Diabetes.

If you’re working to lose weight and keep your Diabetes in check but can’t find any healthy breakfast options with protein that you enjoy, try a smoothie. You can buy protein powder at a health food store (make sure to ask if it has any sugar or artificial sweeteners) and you can put a scoop in to up the nutritional punch!

Diabetic feet are more prone to infection than the average person’s, so check them when you shower for any cuts or bruising. One of the first symptoms of Diabetes that I had was a red speckling on the top of my feet which indicated blood pressure problems, but I didn’t notice as I always wore socks and didn’t have my glasses on in the bathroom. If you already have Diabetes, keep a watchful eye on those tootsies.

Don’t use alcohol swabs before an insulin injection. It’s actually unnecessary, as long as your skin, hands, and needle are clean. Alcohol swabs will dry out the skin, making it more likely that the injection site will stay open. This can actually increase the risk of an infection at the site.

Gestational diabetes can be a dangerous complication of pregnancy. It causes high blood sugar and can affect your health as well as your baby’s. Luckily, gestational diabetes can be controlled by a healthy diet, exercise, and sometimes medication. It usually resolves itself after the baby is born.

Conditions like Gastroparesis can cause your stomach to empty itself of food more slowly than normal after you have eaten a meal. For diabetics, this can translate to unpredictable drops and spikes in blood glucose levels, which can then affect the way that you feel throughout the day. Consider speaking with your doctor about whether you should take your insulin later or sooner than the standard 45 minutes before a meal.

If you find that your A1C levels are disproportionately higher than your typical blood glucose levels, the problem may be that you are measuring your pre-meal levels, which does not give you an accurate reading. Your average levels may not accurately reflect readings that are taken before, during, and after eating your meals.

Women, especially when in their teens and early twenties, may experience significant fluctuations in their blood glucose levels in the week immediately leading up to their menstrual period. Monitor your levels frequently during this time, then make any necessary adjustments in your insulin dosages and urinary ketone measurements, as this can prevent further spikes.

So, it is possible to manage Diabetes! If you have Type 1, Type 2 or Gestational Diabetes, there are some positive steps you can take. Apply the suggestions given in this article. Avoid complications! Don’t let your Diabetes spiral out of control! Plan for success, not distress!