Diabetes Health Tips

Things Everyone Should Know About Their Diabetes

 

 

Are you living with diabetes? Diabetes does not have to be the debilitating disease that some make it out to be. You can have a “normal” life and have diabetes at the same time. Follow our tips on how to make the most out of your life with diabetes.

If your doctor tells you that your Diabetes pills aren’t doing enough to keep your blood glucose levels in check, don’t panic. You won’t necessarily have to use needles as insulin pens are now available that give you the dose you need without being painful. If you can’t afford these pens, some pharmaceuticals have programs to assist you like Needy Meds.

It is important for diabetics to learn to eat a healthy diet and control portion sizes. Eating excessively large portions is a sure way to gain weight. Eating too much, even of foods that are good for you, will result in weight gain and blood sugar problems. Use smaller plates, put your utensils down between bites and eat slower.

Don’t use alcohol swabs before an insulin injection. It’s actually unnecessary, as long as your skin, hands, and needle are clean. Alcohol swabs will dry out the skin, making it more likely that the injection site will stay open. This can actually increase the risk of an infection at the site.

If you have recently found out that you have diabetes, you may want to see a nutritionist. There are certain foods that a diabetic should and should not be eating. A nutritionist can give you a diet plan to follow and tell you where you can purchase these special foods.

Manage your blood glucose sugars with an added sense of urgency if you have been diagnosed with diabetic eye disease. Studies have shown that closely monitored glucose levels can slow the progression and worsening of eye disease over time. This is important even if you have been diagnosed with mild to moderate diabetes.

If you find that your A1C levels are disproportionately higher than your typical blood glucose levels, the problem may be that you are measuring your pre-meal levels, which does not give you an accurate reading. Your average levels may not accurately reflect readings that are taken before, during, and after eating your meals.

When you have diabetes, it is a great idea to eat five to six small meals, instead of three bigger meals a day. Eating smaller, healthy meals frequently during the day helps maintain the stability of your blood sugar levels. More frequent meals also decreases your chances of overcompensating with binging later on.

If you have a family history of diabetes, make sure to have your blood sugar and insulin levels checked at least twice a year. Research has shown that people with a family history of diabetes are at a much higher risk of developing the condition than those with not family history of it.

As you can see, it is possible to live a happy life even if you have diabetes. Living with diabetes is all what you make it, and you can make the best out of it. By following our tips you will learn how to lead a happy life, thus making the best of your health limitations.